Polarizaion: Text Of the Day for May 3, 2018

Today’s text is from John 10:19-20. Jesus has just finished saying he has the power to lay down his life and take it up again:

Again the Judeans were divided because of these words. Many of them were saying, “He has a demon and is out of his mind. Why listen to him?”

 

In the Gospel of John, wherever Jesus goes in Jerusalem, he causes division. Some support him, others reject him (see John 9:16).

People often talk about polarization as a problem in our society, and indeed it is true that we face a challenge adapting to new communications technologies. And it is also true that if we try harder, we can find common ground when arguing about contentious topics.

But polarization is part of change. The authors of This is an Uprising: How Nonviolent Revolt is Shaping the Twenty-First Century point out that polarization is an important tactic:

So much of mainstream politics involves an appeal to togetherness. Politicians perennially pledge to create common ground and help the country’s citizens overcome their disagreements. And yet, social movements often take an approach that is almost the exact opposite: instead of bridging differences between groups, they widen them. (199)

They also quote the words of 19th-century abolitionist Frederick Douglass:

“Those who profess to favor freedom and yet depreciate agitation are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the roar of its many waters.” (205)

Critics often decried Martin Luther King, Jr.’s tactics as “divisive,” the same way they deride every other social movement ever. Sure, people today are polarized. They are polarized primarily because we had a black president, and the ugliness of white supremacy is lashing back. We are beholding our racism, classism, and misogyny laid bare, and it is ugly—and plenty of folks love the ugliness.

John describes what happens when Jesus’ light shines in the darkness: “And this is the judgment, that the light has come into the world, and people loved darkness rather than light because their deeds were evil” (John 3:19). Polarization happens. People either turn toward Jesus’ light or away from it. They either turn toward the love of God incarnate in Jesus, or toward human systems of power and control, toward wounding ourselves, each other, and the world; toward sin.

Along Interstate 65, from Huntsville to Nashville near the Tennessee border, there is a giant silver-and-gold-painted statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first Grand Dragon of the KKK. It is surrounded by Confederate battle flags. It is hideous. You can’t see a close-up of his face from the road, but here it is:

Forrest2

When light shines on the ugliness in our world, on the ways we wound ourselves, each other, and the planet, it is inherently divisive and polarizing. While we can hope that heart-to-heart conversations will find common ground, that hard hearts will become soft, and that the Holy Spirit will lead to conversion, taking sin seriously means recognizing that there are forces of evil determined to hold onto power. What is driving polarization in our country is not simply that people are unwilling to listen to each other. What is driving polarization is the pervasive sin of racism and white supremacy, tucked into the corners of churches, communities, and public offices, masquerading as “economic anxiety” or differences of opinion over policy.

Shining a light on this ugliness may be “divisive.” It is also completely necessary.


Twice a week during Lent (usually Tuesday and Thursday) I do a short reflection on a Bible verse from a devotional and social justice perspective. You can sign up to get a prompt via SMS here: 

Text Of The Day

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3 thoughts on “Polarizaion: Text Of the Day for May 3, 2018

  1. Thanks, Dave. Once again right on point. You help me recognize there’s no comfortable way out of this wreck. And that God has not left us. Keep going, brother! My prayers are with you, Bev Andrews

    On Thu, May 3, 2018 at 8:52 AM Dave Barnhart’s Blog wrote:

    > davebarnhart posted: “Today’s text is from John 10:19-20. Jesus has just > finished saying he has the power to lay down his life and take it up again: > Again the Judeans were divided because of these words. Many of them were > saying, “He has a demon and is out of his mind. Why lis” >

  2. Well argued and thought provoking.

    Over here in the UK we have our own deep divisions – at the moment, particularly over Brexit. But shining a light on this division reveals something ugly that politicians rarely address in their arguments: a deep strain of bigotry and racism, an anti-immigrant prejudice that seems to have at its heart a desire to hang on to what we have and not share anything.

    Thanks for shining some light into dark areas. Lets have more of it.

  3. Polarization is caused by people believing in a fiction like white supremacy.

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